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Are You Allowed to Vote While Wearing a ‘Don’t Tread on Me’ T-Shirt? SCOTUS Will Soon Decide

The following excerpt is from an article that originally appeared on Hit and Run Reason

Does the Constitution permit state governments to create “speech-free zones” that ban political attire within 100 feet of a polling place on election day, even if that attire does not mention a candidate, a campaign, or even a political party? Or does the First Amendment protect the citizenry’s right to wear such attire while casting a ballot?

The U.S. Supreme Court will tackle those questions later this term when it hears oral arguments in Minnesota Voters Alliance v. Mansky. The justices agreed to take up the case yesterday.

At issue is a Minnesota statute declaring that “a political badge, political button, or other political insignia may not be worn at or about the polling place on primary or election day.” The ban applies to all apparel “designed to influence and impact voting” or “promoting a group with recognizable political views.”

Andrew Cilek, the executive director of the conservative group

Click here to Read this Entire Story on Hit and Run Reason


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